Performing Arts

The study of Dance acknowledges the interrelationship between practical and theoretical aspects, the making and performing of movement and the appreciation of its meaning. The ATAR Dance course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. As a physical art form, dance is able to offer an opportunity for them to achieve an elite level of movement skills. They gain an understanding of the physical competencies specific to dance, including experiential anatomy (movement specific alignment), strength, flexibility, coordination and rhythmic understanding, while learning to use the body as a medium for artistic expression. The study of dance draws on other disciplines, including yoga, martial arts and gymnastics. It is essential that students demonstrate safe dance practices and understand health issues that will enhance their general physical well‐being and prolong their dance involvement.

In performing dance, technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. The opportunity to present dance to an audience enables students to understand and undertake a wide range of production and design concepts, skills and roles. Dance may draw on other art forms, such as music, art and electronic media to broaden students’ knowledge and interest in the Arts. Through participation in the Dance course, students develop transferable skills essential to their future. These include communication skills, collaborative teamwork skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, problem solving skills, as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate. Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.  

Unit 1 – Popular Culture

Within the broad focus of popular culture, teachers select learning contexts that relate to the interests of their students and build upon the understandings that they have already acquired.

The exploration of dance in popular culture leads to a wider understanding of the diverse contexts and functions of dance in our society. Students understand and value the way dance is subject to different interpretations, and appreciate that informed responses should take into account the varying contexts within which dance works are created.

Unit 2 – Australian Dance

Within the broad focus of Australian dance, teachers select learning contexts that relate to the interests of their students and build upon the understandings that they have already acquired.

An understanding of the diverse range of functions and contexts of dance in Australia allows students to make relevant comparisons between their own dance and the dance of others. They analyse critically their own cultural beliefs and values in relation to traditional and contemporary dance forms and styles, and develop deeper understandings of their own personal dance heritage. They understand that dance may give form to ideas and issues that concern the wider community.

Prerequisites:

  • Year 10 Dance C Grade or entry upon audition/interview with the Head of Performing Arts, and
  • Year 10 English C grade.

Special exemptions apply to new students to Prendiville and individual cases, at the discretion of the Head of Performing Arts. Please speak to Mr Hislop for further information.

Course Requirements: Students are required to have a Prendiville Dance black leotard and black leggings.

Pathway: Units 3 and 4 ATAR Dance in Year 12.

The Drama ATAR course focuses on aesthetic understanding and drama in practice. Students use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas and explore personal and cultural issues. They engage in drama processes such as improvisation, play building, text interpretation, playwriting and dramaturgy which allow them to create original drama and interpret a range of texts that are written or devised by others. Students achieve outcomes through the key activities of creation, performance and reflection. Their work in this course includes taking on different roles defined as actor, director, dramaturge, designer (of lighting, sound and costume) and scenographer and through these roles they gain an appreciation of the scope and depth in drama. Students engage in both Australian and world drama practice. They learn to understand how drama has changed over time and will continue to change according to its cultural context.

Unit 1 – Representational, Realist Drama

The focus for this unit is representational, realist drama. Students explore techniques of characterisation through different approaches to group based text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Stanislavski and others. In this unit, students have the opportunity to research and collaboratively workshop, interpret, perform and produce texts in forms and styles related to representational, realistic drama that educate and present perspectives.

Unit 2 – Presentational, Non-realist Drama

The focus of this unit is presentational, non-realist drama. Students explore techniques of role and/or character through different approaches to group based text interpretation, particularly those based on the work of Brecht and others. In this unit, students have the opportunity to research and collaboratively workshop, interpret and perform drama texts related to presentational, non-realistic drama that challenge and question perspectives.

Prerequisites:

  • Year 10 Drama C Grade or entry upon audition/interview with the Head of Performing Arts, and
  • Year 10 English C grade.

Special exemptions apply to new students to Prendiville and individual cases, at the discretion of the Head of Performing Arts. Please speak to Mr Hislop for further information.

Course requirements: Students are required to have a pair of theatre blacks for this subject (black pants or shorts and a black t-shirt).

Pathway: Units 3 and 4 ATAR Drama in Year 12.

All Music courses offered at Prendiville are designed to encourage students to participate in musical activity as both a recreational and a vocational choice. It may serve as a pathway for further training and employment in a range of professions within the Music Industry, or simply as a means or experiencing the pleasure and satisfaction that comes from listening to and making music. Whatever the reason, Prendiville Music is an exciting, unique, prestigious and popular choice for students.

The Music ATAR course involves the study of the European tradition of music and its development over time. This is an intricate, challenging and highly interesting course where students study set works from the genres of Concerto and Choral Music.

The course is divided into four content areas:

  • Performing
  • Composing/Arranging
  • Listening and Responding
  • Culture and Society

Unit One: Concerto

In this unit, students study the genre of Symphonic Music from a variety of eras. Students develop skills in the analysis of symphonic works and ensembles, composition, music theory, aural perception and concert practice. Students develop historical knowledge and high-level analysis skills whilst looking at this genre. In this unit, students study the Classical and Romantic eras in depth, as well as a number of prominent symphonic works.

Designated Works – Concerto

Bach, J.S.                    Concerto for two violins in D minor, BWV 1043. 1st and 2nd movements

Beethoven, L. van        Piano concerto no. 3 in C minor, Op. 37. 1st movement

Unit Two: Chamber Music

In this unit, students study the genre of Chamber Music, looking at the development of this genre over a variety of eras. Students develop skills in the analysis of chamber works and ensembles, composition, music theory, aural perception and concert practice. Students develop historical knowledge and high-level analysis skills whilst looking at this genre. In this unit, students study the Classical and Romantic eras in depth, as well as a number of prominent choral works.

Designated Works – Chamber Music

Haydn, F.J.                  String Quartet in D minor, Op. 76, No. 2 (Quinten).  1st and 3rd movements

Brahms, J.                  Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115. 1st and 3rd movements

Prerequisite: Year 10 Prendiville Specialised Music (PSM) B grade or higher and working at AMEB performance Grade 4 or above. Students are required to have their instrumental tutor sign off on their ability to perform at an ATAR level and have an interview with the Head of Performing Arts.

English prerequisite: Year 10 English C grade or higher.

Special exemptions apply to new students to Prendiville and individual cases, at the discretion of the Head of Performing Arts. Please speak to Mr Hislop for further information.

Course requirements: Students must be enrolled in individual tuition (30 minutes or 45 minutes) within the college or externally for the duration of the year on their principal study instrument/voice. Ongoing rehearsals and performances with a professional accompanist throughout the year also incur additional fees.

Pathway: Units 3 and 4 ATAR Music in Year 12

The General Music course is designed to accommodate those students who have a keen interest in music and have some formal training in instrumental or vocal studies. A range of styles will be covered based on the students’ interests in Western Art, Jazz, Contemporary and Music Theatre. As this is offered as a composite course with ATAR Music, students will be assessed on the same Culture and Society component as the ATAR Music students.

The course is divided into four content areas:

  • Performing
  • Composing/Arranging
  • Listening and Responding
  • Culture and Society

Unit One: Concerto

In this unit, students study the genre of Symphonic Music from a variety of eras. Students develop skills in the analysis of symphonic works and ensembles, composition, music theory, aural perception and concert practice. Students develop historical knowledge and high-level analysis skills whilst looking at this genre. In this unit, students study the Classical and Romantic eras in depth, as well as a number of prominent symphonic works.

Designated Works – Concerto

Bach, J.S.                 Concerto for two violins in D minor, BWV 1043. 1st and 2nd movements
Beethoven, L. van     Piano concerto no. 3 in C minor, Op. 37. 1st movement

Unit Two: Chamber Music

In this unit, students study the genre of Chamber Music, looking at the development of this genre over a variety of eras. Students develop skills in the analysis of chamber works and ensembles, composition, music theory, aural perception and concert practice. Students develop historical knowledge and high-level analysis skills whilst looking at this genre. In this unit, students study the Classical and Romantic eras in depth, as well as a number of prominent choral works.

Designated Works – Chamber Music

Haydn, F.J.               String Quartet in D minor, Op. 76, No. 2 (Quinten).  1st and 3rd movements
Brahms, J.               Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115. 1st and 3rd movements

Students studying General Music are not required to sit practical or written exams, but will complete an independent project that relates to their chosen instrumental style.

Prerequisite: Year 10 Prendiville Specialised Music (PSM) C grade or higher, or working at AMEB performance Grade 2 or above.

English prerequisite: Year 10 English C grade or higher.

Special exemptions apply to new students to Prendiville and individual cases, at the discretion of the Head of Performing Arts. Please speak to Mr Hislop for further information.

Course requirements: Students must be enrolled in individual tuition (30 minutes or 45 minutes) within the college or externally for the duration of the year on their principal study instrument/voice.

Pathway: Units 3 and 4 General Music in Year 12

The Music VET standalone course focuses on the areas of performance, ensemble and band skills, sound recording, editing and mixing in a hands-on and practical environment.

The VET Music course makes prime use of our industry-standard recording studio, 300-seat theatre, Music Technology Mac Lab and purpose-built control room, all fitted with a complete package of industry-standard recording and sound equipment and ProTools software. All students in this course are trained in the use of the recording studio, relevant equipment and software, and once trained to a sufficient level, may choose to book the studio out of class time to engineer their own recording.

Students may choose from two streams within this course – performance or technology, and may complete a number of competencies in their choice of a Contemporary, Classical, Jazz or Musical Theatre context.

This course is run in two parts and provides students with the opportunity to complete a full Certificate III over Year 11 and 12, providing them with a recognised industry qualification as well as a credit of 6 units towards their WACE.  A Certificate III will provide students with credit towards WAAPA entry into the Diploma and Advanced Diploma courses (Music Performance or Audio Engineering), SAE (School of Audio Engineering) or another area of study.

Our College partners with Collarts, a registered training organisation for the Certificate III in Music. Students selecting this course will be enrolled with this RTO and inducted into their requirements at the beginning of Year 11.

Whilst this is predominantly a practical class, written components will be required. These must be completed in full and to a high standard in order to meet the requirements of the course.

Cost:  There is an additional cost of $250 to cover the VET auspicing and workshop fees.

Prerequisite: Nil. The study of the Certificate II in Music is an advantage but not essential. Some previous instrumental or vocal experience (beginner level acceptable) is required to complete this course.

Pathway: Certificate III Music Industry (Part Two) in Year 12

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